Seizures caused by the brightly flashing images in video games are more common than most people realize. They can happen even in people with no history of seizures. Most individuals with this type of visual sensitivity (a condition often called photosensitive epilepsy) have their first seizure before knowing they need to be careful around the flash, flicker, on-screen patterns, and intense colors in video games.  As exposure keeps growing to increasingly sophisticated computer graphics, more of the population is at risk for seizures.

Although video games include seizure warnings (online games may not), most of us assume the warnings don't apply to us or our children. This site explains what you should know so that you can be alert for signs of seizures in yourself and others. 


Visit my blog Seizures from Video Games for discussion of medical research findings, commentary on game industry news, and accounts of real people with video game seizures. You can also learn more about me there. 

NOVEMBER 17, 2015

                    Pediatricians should push for fewer seizures!

The pediatricians of this country, working with the American Academy of Pediatrics, are in a position to help reduce the continuing public health risk of video games and other media that can induce seizures. They should lobby the entertainment industry -- something they already apparently do on other media matters -- to produce games without seizure-inducing images.

As I've written previously, the AAP is rethinking its policy on media use by young children. Now it's clear why: the American Academy of Pediatrics' Council on Communications and Media published new data this month on media use by very young children. According to the study, there is “almost universal exposure to mobile devices, and most had their own device by age 4.”

The media landscape has changed significantly since the AAP drafted its 2011 policy
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