VIDEO GAME SEIZURES

Seizures caused by the brightly flashing images in video games are more common than most people realize. They can happen even in people with no history of seizures. Most individuals with this type of visual sensitivity (a condition often called photosensitive epilepsy) have their first seizure before knowing they need to be careful around the flash, flicker, on-screen patterns, and intense colors in video games.  As exposure keeps growing to increasingly sophisticated computer graphics, more of the population is at risk for seizures.


Although video games include seizure warnings (online games may not), most of us assume the warnings don't apply to us or our children. This site explains what you should know so that you can be alert for signs of seizures in yourself and others. 

                                             

Visit my blog Seizures from Video Games for discussion of medical research findings, commentary on game industry news, and accounts of real people with video game seizures. You can also learn more about me there. 


AUGUST 19, 2015

                      Reclaiming a child's brain from video games

Many parents sense that media use affects their children in vague, unseen ways. They’re not imagining it. I have an excellent book to recommend if you’d like to understand more about the way children’s brains–and therefore all aspects of daily function–are stressed by video games. Three years ago I cited a piece by child and adolescent psychiatrist Victoria Dunckley about the effects on the nervous system of interactive screen time. Dr. Dunckley outlined a syndrome of dysregulated mood, attention, executive function, and arousal that develops in response to exposure to video games and other interactive, screen-based applications.

I’m delighted that last month she published a comprehensively researched, clearly and compassionately written book explaining how interactive screens affect children’s mood, thinking, and arousal, with a lot of practical guidance on how to restore their children. In Reset Your Child’s Brain: A Four-Week Plan to End Meltdowns, Raise Grades, and Boost Social Skills by Reversing the Effects of Electronic Screen-Time, Dr. Dunckley validates parents’ concerns, pulling together - more -